Women’s Small Business Month 2023: 5 Ways to Celebrate

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Reviewed by Matt Pelkey
• 5 minute read
A woman wearing an apron stands in the doorway of a retail store, arms folded.

October is National Women’s Small Business Month, an annual celebration of women business owners and entrepreneurs. It’s a time to acknowledge their achievements and unique challenges, as well as highlight valuable resources to further their success.

There were about 400,000 women-owned businesses in the U.S. in 1972, a time when women needed a male relative to co-sign their business loan application. (That continued to be the case until 1988.)

The number of women-owned businesses has grown exponentially since then, including a post-pandemic spike. Today, there are more than 12 million U.S. women-owned businesses.

Whether you’re a female entrepreneur or an ally, take advantage of the events, resources and tips shared here to support women in business — this month and beyond.

How to Celebrate Women’s Small Business Month

Learn from webinars and workshops. Many organizations host webinars and workshops focused on women in business. These events cover a wide range of topics, from marketing strategies to financial management and leadership skills.

Attend networking events. Attend local or virtual networking events to connect with other female entrepreneurs. These events provide a platform to share experiences and build valuable business relationships.

Support initiatives. Look for initiatives like mentorship programs or crowdfunding campaigns that aim to support women-owned businesses.

Shop women-owned small businesses. Use the power of your dollar to directly support women-owned small businesses. You can search for women-owned businesses near you using a directory, such as:

Spread the word. After patronizing a woman-owned business, write a positive review about them and share your experience on social media.

Resources for Women-Owned Businesses

Access to the right resources can significantly impact the success of a women-owned small business.

Small Business Development Centers (SBDCs). SBDCs offer free or low-cost business consulting, training and resources. They can help you with business planning, marketing and financial management.

Women’s Business Centers (WBCs). Women’s Business Centers are dedicated to supporting women entrepreneurs. They provide training, counseling and access to capital.

Online communities. Join online forums and communities specifically designed for women in business. These platforms offer a space to ask questions, share experiences and seek advice from other female entrepreneurs.

Government programs. There are government resources and financing options available to women-owned businesses. The Small Business Administration (SBA), for example, offers a free learning platform for entrepreneurs.

Certification. Get certified as a women-owned business, and add your business to a women-owned business directory.

From Women Small Business Owners

“This month should be less about confetti and balloons and more about empowerment and reflection. It’s a chance for women business owners to step back from the grind, look at the broader picture, and acknowledge the growth — both their own and other entrepreneurs they draw inspiration from.

“I also use the month to deep-dive into resources specifically designed for women in business. We’re talking grants, mentorship programs, and even niche spaces like female-focused co-working spaces. I share these resources with my network because — let’s face it — the glass ceiling hasn’t yet shattered; we’re just dutifully putting more cracks in it by showing up and persevering.

“Celebrating this month is about extending the ladder for the next woman climbing up. It’s paying the empowerment forward, with interest.”

Teresha Aird, Co-Founder & Chief Marketing Officer
Offices.net
My name is Teresha Aird (She/Her). I’m the Co-Founder and CMO of Offices.net — a small online commercial real estate brokerage that connects businesses across the U.S. with their perfect workspace solution.

 

“To honor Women’s Small Business Month, I dedicate time to volunteer with organizations that focus on empowering female entrepreneurs, especially those from marginalized communities. I believe in not just celebrating but also actively contributing to the growth and success of women in business.”

Jessica Carrel, Co-Founder
AnySoftwareTools
I’m Jessica Carrel, Co-Founder of AnySoftwareTools. Experienced in product leadership, I create vision and roadmap for businesses and collaborate with customers and partners to produce results.

 

“While I never intentionally set out to hire exclusively women, I’ve found myself surrounded by highly capable and dedicated women who have greatly contributed to our success.

“To show my appreciation for their commitment, I’ve decided to organize a special family event that includes games, food, and a sense of community. It’s important to acknowledge that women in business often make sacrifices, not only for their careers but also for their families. We bear a multitude of responsibilities in our daily lives, particularly towards our families.

“They often step in or make sacrifices that other families with stay-at-home partners might not have to. Therefore, I believe it’s both appropriate and necessary to honor the entire family unit for their support and understanding.”

Esther Strauss, Co-Founder
Step By Step Business
Esther Strauss is the co-founder of Step By Step Business, as well as an accomplished author and speaker.

 

“Each year, we host a series of events and workshops to amplify the achievements of women in our traditionally male-dominated industry. We collaborate with local female entrepreneurs from various sectors, sharing stories, exchanging business strategies, and fostering collaboration.

“Additionally, we spotlight our women employees, showcasing their journeys, challenges and success through our social media channels and internal communications. It’s essential to foster an environment where women feel seen, valued and motivated to break even more barriers.”

Allison Harrison, Co-Owner
Goodbee Plumbing


DISCLAIMER: This content is for educational and informational purposes only, and is not intended as financial, investment or legal advice. Individuals & businesses mentioned are not an affiliate or agent of OnDeck.

This content is for educational and informational purposes only, and is not intended as financial, investment or legal advice.


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